The role offers an opportunity to work with Web designers, Web developers, scientific service providers, and other UX designers

The European Bioinformatics Institute is looking for a new User Experience (UX) Designer to join the Web Development Team, based in South Cambridgeshire, UK.  Apply now to start working with some of the most interesting and complex UX projects you’ll ever come across.  This would be a great opportunity to diversify your portfolio of UX design, reaching into molecular biology, systems biology, genetics, drug-discovery and more. EMBL recruits internationally and offers benefits As part of EMBL, EBI recruits globally and offers generous benefits, including help for those moving…Continue Reading “Are you looking for a new challenge? EMBL-EBI is hiring a new UX Designer”

Empowering scientists to work better, faster, and easier by applying UCD principles and UX process by Pat Keller, Novartis

Although I am biased (being one of the organisers) I am very happy to report that the joint ‘EMBL-EBI Industry Programme’/’Pistoia Alliance’ pre-competitive workshop on “Success in life science R&D through user experience design” was a triumph. The meeting took place this week at EMBL-EBI on the Wellcome Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge UK and was attended by 35 delegates representing diverse pharmaceutical, agri-food, scientific software, and design companies.  The meeting was chaired by our excellent moderator, Nick Skinner of Poppyfish, with the support of a…Continue Reading “Sketchnotes from the Workshop: “Success in life science R&D through UX design””

Sketchnoting Science Stuff Last week I attended a couple of interesting bioinformatics seminars: one about the burgeoning EBI RDF platform (www.ebi.ac.uk/rdf/platform) was described by Andy Jenkinson of EMBL-EBI…   …and the other from Dr Lee Harland of Connected Discovery, who gave a talk about the current status – and next steps – of the OpenPHACTS project.   Techie Target Audience Both talks were on a similar theme, namely how we can better link publicly-available biological data of different types, which spread across different databases.  The…Continue Reading “Latest bioinformatics sketchnotes…”

10 simple rules

I’m very happy to say that PLoS Computational Biology Journal have just published our latest article: “Ten Simple Rules for Running Interactive Workshops”.  Our piece is this month’s featured paper too, which we are thrilled about! (Issue front page is here.)     What’s it about? Well, it’s kind of self-explanatory, but let me explain why we wrote it.  Colleagues at the EBI often ask me how to go about planning a workshop; for example, they may need to gather feedback from users, to brainstorm…Continue Reading “Paper: Ten Simple Rules for Running Interactive Workshops”

Attitudes towards sharing IFs

This past Friday on the Genome Campus, Dr Anna Middleton of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute gave an interesting seminar about the method and findings of a survey she had delivered about genome ethics. I was interested because I use surveys in my work to understand people’s attitudes towards and experience of websites, but also because I care about how genomics is perceived or experienced by people both within and outside of science. Creating an engaging survey experience A unique aspect of Anna’s survey was…Continue Reading “Survey talk: Attitudes towards sharing incidental findings from genome research”

I’ve just realised that I never blogged about the article on user experience that was featured in EMBL’s newsletter last year.  The piece was actually published in the October 2013 issue of EMBL&cetera, but it is still available online. Some more background info from me… The first explicit role in user experience at the EBI was the position I took up at the end of 2009.  Since then (without blowing our own trumpets too hard) I think that the work of Francis Rowland (who also…Continue Reading “Status of UX at the European Bioinformatics Institute”

DNA barcodes and biodiversity

On Friday, I attended an interesting seminar on DNA barcoding by Dr. Paul Hebert, Director of the Biodiversity Institute of Ontario, Canada. I had a basic idea about how you might go about “barcoding” life on earth, but I didn’t really understand why you would want to.  Paul’s talk illuminated me by explaining that having barcodes you can much more easily measure the biodiversity (i.e. the number of species) in any given sample, even if the individual species are not actually known/named.  To do this…Continue Reading “DNA Barcodes: measuring biodiversity on Earth”

Yesterday I attended a talk about clinical trial data, by Paul Houston of CDISC, Europe.  CDISC is the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium.  This organisation looks into ways to make it possible for open access and interchange of clinical data.  I sketchnoted Paul’s talk – which was about the latest developments in making clinical trial data open for all.  

At a recent talk by Elspeth Bruford entitled “Gene naming in the past, present and future“,  I learned about the process for naming genes. Elspeth works in the HUPO Gene Nomenclature Committe (HGNC) team, which is based at EMBL-EBI.  Check out the website where you can find out more about HGNC’s work.